Movement patterns of our Asian elephants have been a conundrum in the ever increasing human dominated landscape. PERHILITAN has adopted the method of translocating elephants from conflict and relocating them to intact forested settings. Together with the Wildlife Department, we are collaring elephants to monitor their movement behavior to assess the efficacy of translocation as a mitigation strategy.

Coming soon

Highway viaducts were strategically built to facilitate wildlife dispersal and emigration, an essential component to a viable population. However, we are unaware of the efficiency of these structures in wildlife mobility or its role in providing access to encroachers. Hence this study aims to evaluate the effects of highway viaducts on large mammal movement in Peninsular Malaysia.

Coming soon

In the thick tropical rainforests of Peninsular Malaysia, the study of wild elephant ecology and behavior cannot rely on direct observation. We are currently working to develop the local capacity to use non-invasive indirect molecular methods to obtain data about our study populations. In other words, we aim to use dung to obtain DNA and answer questions.

Coming soon

We are developing and applying non-invasive methods to monitor stress levels of wild elephant individuals and populations under different types of human disturbances: (1) translocation of conflict individuals, (2) elephant inhabiting fragmented landscapes, and (3) elephants experiencing high levels of human-elephant conflict.

Coming soon

Asian elephants live in countries with some of the highest human-densities in the world. In the long-run, we will only be able to conserve elephants if we manage to mitigate the so-called human-elephant conflict. In MEME, we aim to understand the human and elephant dimensions of this conflict and to develop scientifically-tested methods to mitigate it.

Coming soon

The most remarkable feature of elephants is their huge body size. This makes elephants unique and ecologically difficult to replace. We are studying the ecological role of elephants in the dispersal of megafaunal-syndrome plants. These are plants such as mangoes, durians, or chempedaks, with fruits and seeds so large that cannot be easily swallowed and disperser by smaller animals.

Coming soon